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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
by anonymous as well as the release of the nsa files constitutes an act of terrorism. certainly the impacts have been dramatic. they been political in nature. but they have also certainly had impacts far beyond what to expect to find on a thumb drive. once again, that using sample of an intelligent individual, and eric an individual, and he disassociated individual. feeling free to carry out what he or she felt to be a legitimate exercise of his self-imposed authority. going back to the questions you asked. 9/11, a redo on that. for the lone wolf i would argue that a 9/11 spectacular or anything with that kind of the body count is probably beyond their reach. probably. there are some -- you could have the perfect storm. you could argue that 9/11 itself was the perfect storm. eighth circuit exceeded the expectations of al qaeda. will society survived? yes, society will survive. society will survive because where more resilient than any one individual or one small group of individuals. we are a society of 350 million within a larger society of 6 billion. yes, so -- society will survive but at
to the implementation of these major policy issues. whether it's national security and the nsa. or his health care law. it asit inattention or is some people have suggested people not wanting to tell the president bad news? himself with nd people who are willing to tell wrong?en things are going >> that's a good distinction to make. the ng to people inside white house is the fastest way to get on the president's side is not telling him what he want to hear. but that said, there was a lot shared with the president. and this goes back to this year irs turned inspector auditors report about paying attention to conservative groups. he wasn't aware of that, wasn't told that at the time even staff knew that. he increasingly surrounds himself with people he knows well. he does not have a lot of contacts in washington. time not spend a lot of here before becoming president. his small circle of close advisors are getting smaller and his time in office wears on. >> the first 45 minutes of the ashington journal this morning talking about congress. scott wilson, "the washington ost" white house bureau chief focu
the loss of 50,000 documents through a data sharing scheme between gchq and nsa. if that amounts to oversight, the amount of oversight, the budget for oversight even now is 1.3 million pounds, supposedly a secret incidentally, which is i think about a third of the amount that the council spends on car parts. >> the prime minister in the chamber said that he wants to reach agreement, or words to that effect, with "the guardian" that if "the guardian" is not willing to see the point of view of the authorities then, with reluctance, other measures may be taken. presumably he's referring to the notices and the rest. can ask you this question? how far do you feel that there is a threat to the newspaper if you continue to publish revelations from snowden lex do you feel under pressure? >> things have happened in this country which would be inconceivable in europe or -- parts of europe and in america. they include prior restraint. they included a senior whitehall official going to see an edit to say, there's been enough debate now. they include asking for the destruction of our discs. t
to be imposing some self-restraint on the nsa. what does that process and tell entail? >> the president is continuing to review ideas. i think it is important that you noted an important point yesterday. he made important point yesterday that i know he believes deeply. the work done by the nsa, and others in our intelligence agencies, is vital to keeping america and americans safe, as was keeping our ally safe. we cannot lose sight of that. the president said in his comment yesterday, things that reflected and echoed what he said in the past about things that he can do and reforms that we can make a better wise without forgetting that the fundamental mission that is undertaken by our intelligence community is designed to make americans and america safer. >> we understand that he is getting a report yesterday -- next week about the nsa -- >> i don't have any scheduling announcements today. >> the president said he wanted to see immigration reform, health care reform, and a budget. is there a timetable on those? is there a way to get those or is this an ongoing process? >> we talked about
month i debated general counsel of the nsa steward baker and he said between what ed snowden did and what journalists did, once the information is in the hands of journalists it is protected material. a nice reading of our own bbc and the guidelines he laid down in the process, the public interest will weigh heavily and highly in any deliberations he takes. >> >> and what he was engage in, which was distributing the national borders. >> we were cheri in this with the new york times, ordered to stimulated debate, which is vital. >> is their current police investigation into "the guardian"? >> i don't know. communications with you all. >> i have seen scotland yard say they are holding an investigation. in records, as a public record the committee decided to call the head of am i 5 in open session. >> did you have advance notice of the questions asked of you today? >> the general areas of concern that might be covered. the intelligence and security meeting, carefully manicured questions, rehearsed questions, the committee accused of approval for the government, and the cheerleaders
on the tv talk shows. >> i don't know what that show was. nsa, where does that process stand on the restraint? >> it's under way. president is continuing to review ideas and i think it's --ortant that he noted other an important point yesterday. not well said. he made an important point that deeply that the work done by the nsa. the others in the intelligence keeping vital to america and americans safe as well as keeping our allies safe. and we can't lose sight of that. said in his dent comments things reflected what past things we an do and the reforms we can make that are wise without forgetting that the fundamental by our is undertaken intelligence community is make ed to and does americans and americans safer. >> we understand you're going next week about the advisory group he named in the nsa. is that the pivot point on -- >> i don't have any scheduling nnouncements on that issue to provide today. he's actively engaged in the agenda. >> three things the president wanted to see, immigration reform, a farm bill, and a budget. about to leave. any sort of timetable on those
to the implementation of these major policy issues, whether national security in the case of the nsa, or whether it is his health care law, which is legacy. is it people not wanting to tell the president bad news? is he not willing to surround tell himith people who that things are wrong? there was a lot of bad news not shared with the president. this goes back to this year, the irs inspector general's report about paying particular attention to conservative groups. that, not aware of told of that, even though senior staff knew. surroundedy, he himself by people that he knew. he did not have many contacts in washington, did not spend much time here before becoming president. circle ofady close advisers became smaller and smaller as his time or on. we are talking about congress with scott wilson, the white house chief euro spokesperson for "the washington post." we are talking about the recent rollout of healthcare.gov, saidcism that has been about that. woodbridge, virginia. good morning, you are on with scott wilson. i want to address the issue that if you want to keep your insurance company, y
might be interested in what you're doing. and they are not all called nsa. [laughter] but at any rate, i was accepted, to my surprise. and i went to cambridge, and i remember that there were a lot of people in the law school, and it was very confusing. i escaped from that madness. it was sort of like the scene that you see in "the stranger" in camus. having this weird experience out there. that is what happened to me at harvard. i became like breathless, oh, my goodness, a panic attack. i got back to holy cross and said, there is no way i can go there. it is big and all these people are walking around dressed up like they were going into the corporate world. back then, we were anti- corporations. i decided to go to penn, actually. i had not been accepted at yale. i was going to go to penn law school. yale had sent me, you knew you were accepted if they sent a big packet of materials. yale sent me the thinnest of letters. we are not into the catalog thing. we are yale. [laughter] not only that, they sent it to my grandparents in savannah, georgia, who never open my mail because they could
morning, everyone. here are your headlines. the washington post reports that the nsa is gathering nearly 5 billion records per day on the whereabouts of cell phones around the world. the documents given to the post by edward snowden. u.s. officials say the collection is lawful. around the country today, fast food rest word -- workers will walk off the job as part of the continued push to raise minimum wage and secure the rights to unionize. lawmakers
. [ applause ] >> so to our friends at the nsa, we say hello, we think ou're doing a great job. in any event, the senators are famous for speaking at great lengths. i won't do that to you today. but let me just say that i have a great deal of admiration for state legislators. i developed that in my own right when i became governor. is senator long still here? senator -- i see pat. pat, raise your hand. senator miller and senator wong was here. i guess he had to step out. but in any event, i was elected governor at the ripe old age of 32. my birthday was in september i matured. i took office when i was 33. i did not serve in the state legislature. i had served as secretary of state. i'd been involved politically. but i had a chance to get to know the members of the senate and the house the way i would like to and i did over the next eight years. and i realized pretty quickly, john, probably the same way in utah, we have a saying in indiana that governor proposes, state legislature, isposes. so i realized we needed to try to find common ground. and i had to challenge right away in my eight yea
agency, the nsa, the joint chiefs of staff regularly working together. sandy chaired a tenty's committee -- deputy's committee that kept all the agencies working together. we were committed to sharing information, not hoarding it, to try to reconcile the apparent inconsistencies and then to make good decisions. you know, i love all these shows, homeland and all that stuff. i love that stuff. [laughter] but the real world involves all these cia folks out there killing themselves to figure out what is really going on and how to get that back to the oil makers. to the policymakers. and what leon says is right, you have to be an active, not passive consumer of intelligence. otherwise, someone just assumes that your bandwidth has been choked in 1994 and '95, and you wind up like we were, not even having a meeting about rwanda. because you're so obsessed with all this other stuff. so the obligation of the policymakers is to be aggressive in this saying what we need. i also agree with the comments that were made in the panel about the need to have someone representing these intelligence forces
made by snowden as far as the nsa is concerned. have they affected the dia and your ability. your agency's ability to function as usual prior to the revelations? i don't know if there is anybody that worked at nsa. it's an extraordinary capability. a national capability for our country's national security. the work force and men and women up here are some of the most talented people we have in the intelligence community today. so, you know, they are challenged today because of this incredible outpouring of attention they don't frankly deserve it. the work force doesn't deserve it. they are -- and in all the while that all of this stuff is going on in the news today, they're up there today 24/7. i wouldn't just say up there but global work force on the battle needle afghanistan and many other part of the world working 24/7 to protect our national security. national security agency is a national treasure. now to answer your question, has it affected us? absolutely. will it affect us in the future? absolutely. is what the -- the tragedy of megaproportions? absolutely. it's being deal
. [laughter] so to our friends at the nsa, we say hello. we think you're doing a great job las. [laughter] senators are famous for speaking at great length. i want to do today but let me say i have a great deal of admiration for state legislators. i developed that in my own right when i became governor. by the way, is the sender long still? path, raise your hand. senator miller is here from a indiana and senator long was a. i guess it just about. but in any event, one of our regrets i was elected at the ripe old age of 32. my birthday is in september so i have matured by the time it took office i was 33. i regretted not served in the state legislature. i served as secretary of state and i've been involved politically but i hadn't had a chance to get to know the members of the senate and house the way that i would like to come and that it did over the next eight years. i realized pretty quickly, jon, i'll be the same when utah, we have a saying in indiana that governors propose. state legislatures disposes. so i realize we needed to try to find common ground, and i had a challenge right aw
the nsa is listening to everything that we say, you can use bitcoin to avoid all of that. it is a bit of a phenomenon of the state of the world, about your ability to be anonymous online. that is what bitcoin provides. it gives you anonymity. no one can trace that dollar back to me. this is anonymous. so, money is this mirror of exchange. -- medium of exchange. how do we get money? we get money by creating stuff. we get money by building. we get money by being productive. by being innovative. by going to work and working hard. the more productive we are -- in an economy that works right, the more productive you are, the more money you get. money is a reflection of our own productivity. it is a reflection of the work that we do. it is a reflection of our success. money is never -- it shouldn't be -- money is not an end in itself. why do these wealthy guys still work? they could three generations or four generations could try to spend this money. why do they keep working? why do they keep making money? because money measures our success. it measures the amount of value that we create. y
accurate reports than what was going on in in bosnia and then with the balkan task force the cia the nsa the joint chiefs of staff were being together. chairing a an event to keep them working together we were sharing information and not according and. the then to make good decisions. i love all these shows like homeland. but real world involves us cia folks what is really going on? in how to get that back to the policy makers. you have to be active not passive consumer of intelligence otherwise they assume you have been choked and not even having a meeting for rwanda. because you are so obsessed with the and other stuff. but i also agree with the panel with the intelligence forces to be in the room to be -- to get more information is as might experience the only time the cia went beyond that was before george tenet was inactive partner in the palestinian intelligence services promoting meat -- peace to the middle east that was the only year in the entire history not one israeli was killed were the leadership of the country changed hands. we live in a world it is easy. with the lasting i
would want the allied intelligence service to do. so we spent three weeks saying the nsa isn't listening to french or spanish phone calls. there is a bi-partisan group going to brussels in two weeks and i am leading the delegation to have these discussions. we don't want to have them use this as an excuse for excluding american companies to operate in europe. there would be no reason to that. and again, these are not companies run, owned and operated or we don't plug into them as you might see in the press for american i.t. companies. i told my european agencies we sent our intelligence to a court before they go go and listening to a foreigner. name another intelligence service in the world that sends their certainss services to a third party to see if they can listen to the united states? do you think they are having this conversation in france? or china? no. the europeans screaming the loudest don't have access to their intelligence service. we will have that conversation so they don't use it. the companies are saying let's exclude the companies because they are safe because it is in f
trying to explain to people, the nsa is not listening to french phone calls, not listening to spanish phone calls. i just met with a group from the european union yesterday and there is a bipartisan group in two weeks.els i am leading the delegation. we will have these discussions, because what we do not want to happen is for them to use this -- asx use for excluding an excuse for excluding american companies operating. there would be no reason to do that. candidly, and these are not companies run him a owned, operated we do not plug into them, as you might see in the press, for our american i.t. companies. it just does not happen. we have laws and protection and oversight. i told my allies, we send our intelligence services to the foreign intelligence surveillance court before they a foreign.listen to name another intelligence service in the world that sends them to a third-party court to see if they can listen to the united states. do you think they are having this conversation in china or france or germany or italy? as a matter of fact, the europeans who are screaming the loudest d
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)